Output – IESR – Latest Additions RSS feed

Title: IESR Latest Additions RSS feed

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/feeds/latestadditions.xml

Summary of contents:

Allows applications or users to subscribe to the 10 latest resources added to IESR.

Additional information:

Comments:

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Output – IESR – OpenURL Link-To Resolver

Title: IESR OpenURL Link-To Resolver

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/use/openurl/

Summary of contents:

“The IESR OpenURL ‘Link-To’ Resolver service provides retrieval of IESR XML records for single entities using Z39.88-2004, OpenURL Framework, syntax. Currently support for OpenURL syntax is limited allowing retrieval by identifier only using a Key/Encoded Value (KEV) request inline by HTTP. Values must be URL-encoded.”

Additional information:

Comments:

Output – IESR – HTML Plug-in

Title: IESR Registry HTML Plug-in

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/use/htmlplugin/

Summary of contents:

“The IESR Search HTML Plug-in allows you to add an IESR search to your website in order to discover new electronic resources. The plug-in is a simple HTML search box that shows results on the IESR website.”

Additional information:

You need a basic knowledge of HTML and CSS plus the ability to edit webpages. Simply add the following HTML, CSS and Javascript to your webpage to create the search box.

Comments:

Project – OpenDoar

Project Name: OpenDoar

Programme Name:Digital Repositories Programme 2005-7

Strand: Information Environment, e-Administration

JISC Project URI: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitalrepositories2005/opendoar.aspx

Project URI: http://www.opendoar.org/

Start Date: 1st Jan 2005

End Date: 30th June 2006

Governance:

Contact Name and Role: Bill Hubbard, Project Manager

Brief project description:

“OpenDOAR will categorise and list the wide variety of Open Access research archives that have grown up around the world. Such repositories have mushroomed over the last 2 years in response to calls by scholars and researchers worldwide to provide open access to research information.

OpenDOAR will provide a comprehensive and authoritative list of institutional and subject-based repositories, as well as archives set up by funding agencies – like the National Institutes for Health in the USA or the Wellcome Trust in the UK and Europe. Users of the service will be able to analyse repositories by location, type, the material they hold and other measures. This will be of use both to users wishing to find original research papers and for third-party “service providers”, like search engines or alert services, which need easy to use tools for developing tailored search services to suit specific user communities.”

Outputs:

  • Descriptive list of open access repositories of relevance to academic research.
  • Comprehensive & authoritative list for end users wishing to find particular types of, or specific repositories.
  • Comprehensive, structured and maintained list with clear update and self-regulation protocols to enable development of the list.
  • Crominent international role in the organisation of and access to open access repository services.
  • Supporting Open Access outreach and advocacy endeavours within institutions and globally.
  • Survey the growing field of academic open access research repositories and categorise them in terms of locale, content and other measures

Output – UHRA – University of Hertfordshire Research Archive

Title: The University of Hertfordshire Research Archive

Date Released: Approx September 2007

URI for Output: https://uhra.herts.ac.uk/dspace/

Summary of contents:

The main output from this project is the establishment of the University of Hertfordshire Research Archive. It is described as “.. a showcase of the research produced by the University of Hertfordshire staff (copyright permitting) which is freely available over the web” and ” .. provides a simple interface to enable researchers to self-archive the full text of their published work with just a few quick and easy steps.”

Additional information:

Comments:

The archive/repository appears to be fully functional and contains 2556 items as at 30th January 2007.

Output – NECTAR: Nectar Case History – embedding

Title: NECTAR: Northampton Electronic Collection of Theses And Research

Pages: all
Date Released: 2008

Summary of contents:
“Existing research reporting channels are being exploited to gather NECTAR content. From January 2008 the university’s Annual Research Report will be derived from NECTAR — if a research output is not in NECTAR it will not be reported.”

URI for Output: http://nectar.northampton.ac.uk/NECTAR_case_study_OR08_ver2.pdf

Comments:
this case study is largely superceded by the fuller later one – but i don’t recollect this line in the later article.
This illustrates both how embedded the NECTAR repository has become within the institution and also one of the roles a repsitory can play in the institutional infrastructure.

Output – NECTAR: ALISS Case Study – embedding

Title:Gathering NECTAR at The University of Northampton

Pages: 2-7
Date Released: 2008

Summary of contents:
Quotes highlighted in article’s text provide useful summary of key features of this output.

  • “From the start, NECTAR has been a joint project between the Department of Information Services and the research community. This was not to be seen as a ‘library thing’.”
  • “By consulting widely at an early stage we gained greater understanding of our future users’ needs, generated interest in the project and flagged up future challenges.”
  • “Gaining commitment from your own senior management is crucial; involving them in the direction of the project is even better.”
  • “A snappy name, ideally with positive connotations, is easy to remember and works well later in marketing and advocacy activities. “
  • “Gaining acceptance of NECTAR’s fundamental principles by the University Research Committee gave them ownership of the repository and gave it an authority which could be exploited later.”
  • “The combination of outsourced initial implementation followed by ongoing in-house support has worked extremely well for us; the service provided by the Eprints team has been particularly good.”
  • “Populating the repository with the institution’s most prestigious research outputs [i.e. the metadata of RAE submitted papers] not only set a high standard for the showcase, but also conveyed a clear message to potential depositors: this is where the best research should be.”
  • “By embedding NECTAR into the research reporting processes of the university, the repository immediately became part of researchers’ normal workflow.”

URI for Output: http://nectar.northampton.ac.uk/1283/

Citation: [accepted version] Pickton, M. (2008) Gathering NECTAR at The University of Northampton. ALISS Quarterly. 3(4), pp. 33-38. 1747-9258.

Comments:
The italicised quotes highlight some of the key features of the embedding strategy so far and offer an example of the advocacy dimension of the process of setting up a repository.