Output – IncReASe: Final Report – bulk import

Title: IncReASe: Final Report

Page: 12-13, 21

Date Released: 30 April 2009
URI for Output: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/increase/increase_finalreportv1.pdf

Summary of contents:
The project looked at importing from departmental bibliographic databases and from other departmental bibliographic collections (some of which where created explicitly for this purpose).

“It is interesting to note that the department preferred on balance to create their own local database and upload material en masse at the end of the summer. Similar suggestions have been made from time to time by other departments even though creating an additional collection system involves more work at the local level. For example, we have been asked to provide an Excel template to allow data to be collected ready for periodic bulk import into the repository.Though this approach may seem counterintuitive, local academics and administrators have suggested that, for some departments, this [local collection] may be a more sustainable method of data collection. Such solutions may be worth considering, perhaps as an interim measure, where sustained self-archiving activity is proving particularly elusive – though could prove counterproductive overall.”

It is also of note a number of departments already had their own bibliographic management tools. Some of which could export in formats that are directly importable into ePrints via plugins (DOI, EndNote, BibTex, Multiline Excel and PubMed ID). more detaisl on the use of the plugions ar available: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/increase/plugins.html [page 18 notes that one difficulty with using DOI material from crossref is the lack of author data as a result “We have used CrossRef as a base source of metadata but not to enhance metadata in records already created within the repository.”]

The project notes that some of the desire to use other tools maybe be sidestepped by future developments that better integrate repository deposit into researcher’s workflows and by the introduction of research information/ management systems.

From the conlcusions
“There are likely to be personal and departmental sources of metadata suitable for bulk import at most /all HEIs. The metadata within such systems may well be inconsistent and incomplete. We found import to be more time-consuming than we hoped. A high degree of manual intervention was required: mainly to supplement incomplete metadata or add full publication details to imported “in press” items. Unless effective ways can be found to automatically check and improve bulk metadata this type of import may be a false economy and may not be the best way to grow the repository sustainably nor to embed into researchers’ workflow. An alternative approach would be to identify sources of pre-quality checked metadata – possibly from commercial sources – to create a back-catalogue of publication metadata.”

Comments:
There is again a highlighted concern about alternative solutions impacting on the adoption of self-archiving.

[I think] The project’s experience that departments may opt to run their own bibliographic systems is an important reminder that there is not one solution to either archiving Open Access copies and that information in one place does not equate to information in one system.

It demonstrates the effective use of a number of plugins around the e-prints software to successfully import data.

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Output – IncReASe: Final Report – research management

Title: IncReASe: Final Report

Page: 14, 21-22

Date Released: 30 April 2009
URI for Output: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/increase/increase_finalreportv1.pdf

Summary of contents:
All three universitiies particpating in WRRO have begun to examine Research management systems with differing results.
University of Sheffield have put their working group’s findings on hold pending more information about the REF but are investigating systems.
University of York is currently scoping a Research Information System (WRRO is likley to have a significant role)
University of Leeds has selected a system. Their RIS system “will [probably] become the primary ingest route for both metadata and full text”. As yet workflows and staffing (including any involvement of repository or library staff) for the metadata creation in this new system are unclear. As the source of metadata and primary point of contact with academic/ research staff this has the potential to greatly benefit the integration of WRRO into the publication process.

From the conlucions:
“Our discussion with researchers suggests that a comprehensive service – essentially, a publication database – is probably an easier sell than a pure “open access” repository (echoing the conclusions previously drawn by, for example, the TARIS project); its raison d’être is clearer and the possibility for providing services back to researchers in the form of full listings of research and detailed information on traffic to individual works, is increased. Currently, this is not the direction being taken by WRRO; rather, because other central services are likely to fulfil the publication database function, the emphasis remains on external dissemination of open access outputs.”
“Capturing grant and project data relevant to research outputs is likely to increase in importance; this data can help maximise the value of repository content for both research and administrative purposes.”

Comments:
The RIS system at Leeds does of course also raise potential to difficulties for metadata quality.

All three institutions invovled in WRRO are actively moving towards some form of CRIS system; in all institutions this will impact significantly on the role and prominence of the repository. It is not clear how positive or negative this impact will be. What is clear is that for a institutional repositories covering the area of scholarly communicaitons CRIS systems are very likely to change what and how they operate.

Output – IESR – Latest Additions RSS feed

Title: IESR Latest Additions RSS feed

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/feeds/latestadditions.xml

Summary of contents:

Allows applications or users to subscribe to the 10 latest resources added to IESR.

Additional information:

Comments:

Output – IESR – OpenURL Link-To Resolver

Title: IESR OpenURL Link-To Resolver

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/use/openurl/

Summary of contents:

“The IESR OpenURL ‘Link-To’ Resolver service provides retrieval of IESR XML records for single entities using Z39.88-2004, OpenURL Framework, syntax. Currently support for OpenURL syntax is limited allowing retrieval by identifier only using a Key/Encoded Value (KEV) request inline by HTTP. Values must be URL-encoded.”

Additional information:

Comments:

Output – IESR – Registry m2m Interfaces (OAI-PMH, SRU/W and Z39.50)

Title: IESR Registry Machine to Machine Interfaces (OAI-PMH, SRU/W and Z39.50)

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output:  http://iesr.ac.uk/use/oaipmh/, http://iesr.ac.uk/use/sru/http://iesr.ac.uk/use/z3950/

Summary of contents:

These outputs provide m2m interfaces for cross, meta- or federated search applications.

Additional information:

Comments:

Output – IESR – HTML Plug-in

Title: IESR Registry HTML Plug-in

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/use/htmlplugin/

Summary of contents:

“The IESR Search HTML Plug-in allows you to add an IESR search to your website in order to discover new electronic resources. The plug-in is a simple HTML search box that shows results on the IESR website.”

Additional information:

You need a basic knowledge of HTML and CSS plus the ability to edit webpages. Simply add the following HTML, CSS and Javascript to your webpage to create the search box.

Comments:

Output – IESR – IESR Registry

Title: IESR Registry

Date Released: Unknown

URI for Output: http://iesr.ac.uk/service/iesrbrowse?type=new

Summary of contents:

“IESR is a resource discovery tool intended to benefit the UK academic community. Access is through web and machine interfaces or search plug-ins.”

Additional information:

There are a number of machine to machine interfaces to the IESR. The link above is to the web interface aimed at users.

Comments: