Project – SOAPI

Project Name: Service-Oriented Architecture for Preservation and Ingest of digital objects

Programme Name: Digital Preservation and Records Management Programme

Strand:

JISC Project URI: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/preservation/soapi.aspx

Project URI: http://www.ahds.ac.uk/about/projects/soapi/

Start Date: 1st March 2007

End Date:30th September 2008

Governance:

Contact Name and Role: Marke Hedges, Project Manager

Brief project description:

“The project will develop an architecture and toolkit for (partially) automating preservation and ingest workflows in digital repositories, based on a set of atomic web services, each encapsulating a unit of preservation functionality, combined with web-based forms when human input is required. A workflow orchestration tool will be used to combine these services and user input functions, creating workflows that minimise the need for human intervention.”

Outputs:

  • Production quality toolkit, based on this flexible and extensible architecture, that will allow repository managers to construct preservation workflows.
  • Speculative research, investigating the use of semantic annotation of web services to allow preservation services to be dynamically discovered and executed at run-time.
Advertisements

Project – Sherpa DP2

Programme Name: Digital Preservation and Records Management Programme

Strand:

JISC Project URI: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/preservation/sherpadp2

Project URI: http://www.sherpadp.org.uk/sherpadp2.html

Start Date: 1st March 2007

End Date: 31st March 2009

Governance:

Contact Name and Role: Sheila Anderson, Project Director

Brief project description:

“The purpose of the project is to develop a full preservation environment capable of serving a range of diverse repositories and content types. It will extend the test-bed collaborative service developed for the SHERPA DP project, to consider a range of different repository archiving models.

As with the initial SHERPA DP project, the collaborative model will develop the relationship between a Content Provider and a Service Provider. The institutional repositories participating in the project will serve as Content Providers, undertaking activities associated with the acceptance and dissemination of digital data. The Arts & Humanities Data Service will serve as a Service Provider, performing activities associated with preservation management, addressing the diverse requirements of digital objects throughout their lifecycle. This will remove the requirement for each repository to employ scarce resources to the development and/or implementation of their own preservation layer.

The expansion of the preservation environment for such diverse range of institutional repositories will require an analysis of their operation, including the type of metadata they create and store, the workflow processes that they use, and other aspects. This will provide a rich set of reports that compare and contrast the operation of each repository. As a result of the investigation, the various aspects of the collaborative model will be reviewed and revised as necessary.

Furthermore, the project will expand upon the basic business model for Service Providers that was developed for SHERPA DP, by establishing an economic cost model that could be used to ensure the long-term sustainability of a distributed preservation service.”

Outputs:

  • Extend Sherpa DP OAIS-based distributed preservation model.
  • Investigate and develop tools to transform repository content (digital objects) as base64 encoded bitstreams for placing inside METS packages.
  • Investigate and assess other methods for connecting to digital repositories and downloading repository metadata and content.
  • Refine the Sherpa DP set of protocols and software in order to interact with institutional repositories using a wider range of repository software applications.
  • Amend, update and expand as appropriate the Digital Preservation User Guide produced by the original Sherpa DP project to take account of the outcomes and lessons of the Sherpa DP2 project.

Project – Rich Tags

Project Name: Rich Tags: Supporting better exploration of digital repositories with semantic social tagging

Programme Name: Repositories and Preservation Programme

JISC Project URI: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_rep_pres/rich_tags.aspx

Project URI: http://mspace.fm/projects/richtags/

Start Date: February 2007

End Date: January 2009

Governance: Repositories and Preservation Advisory Group

Contact Name and Role: Monica Shraefel, Project Manager

Brief project description:

“Tagging is an increasingly popular mechanism used on the web to add personal categorisations to artefacts of information. Many popular web applications such as Blogging, photo communities and other community-based sharing sites allow users to add tags to their artefacts to give them a more personal meaning that can be shared and used publicly among the community. Tag aggregators at sites like Flickr, Delicious and Technorati show degree of popularity of a given tag via a Tag Cloud which generally uses font size to represent degree of use: more popular tags show up with larger, bolder fonts. Clicking on a tag takes one to a page listing each occurrence of that tag. This result list demonstrates one of the weaknesses of social tagging: these link lists are both undifferentiated and ambiguous. That is, clicking on a tag for a conference may return hundreds of photos in a photo space of that conference, but provide no mechanism for getting at a photo of the speaker of interest. Likewise multiple groups may have multiple meanings for the same tag. There is no way with conventional tags to associate a particular meaning of a tag with its signifier to see only results associated with a given understanding of the term. Because of these problems with number and ambiguity, tags are used mainly to show some sense of levels of interest in a topic within a community, since they are not particularly effective for exploring back into the Tag Cloud to look for interesting content associated with that tag. In this proposal we plan to explore how, by addressing the number and ambiguity problems, social tagging might be redesigned to improve digital repository functionality for cross-repository exploration and discovery. We call this approach Semantic Tagging.”

Outputs:

  • Web services to support the creation of and access to semantic tags associated with IR artefacts for the purpose of cross-repository exploration.
  • A test framework to support the publishing and discovery of cross-repository tags.
  • Exploration of automatic association of such tags with repository artefacts.
  • Evaluations of social semantic tagging in use.
  • Exploration of role of Trust in take-up and use of social tagging for EPrints exploration.
  • Recommendations both in terms of architecture and usability, stemming from evaluation for the larger scale deployment or adaptation of social semantic tagging.